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How to take care of a Malinois?

Taking care of Malinois needs our joint efforts. Malinois is an alert, energetic breed that is very popular as a police and military working dog. Although sometimes mistaken for a German shepherd, the Malinois is more elegant in construction and light in bone, but does not lack strength, agility or grazing ability. Active in conformation, obedience, Schutzhund, grazing, sledding and tracking, varieties range in color from rich beige to mahogany, black pointed hair and black masks and ears.

how-to-take-care-of-a-malinois

Taking care of Malinois’ exercise needs

If Malinois of Belgium can get enough exercise, he can perform well on a small scale. They like cool climate, but they can adapt to warm environment well. They should always live indoors as part of the family. If possible, in addition to trekking or jogging, give your Malinois some exercise without a leash in a fenced area. When we take care of Malinois, we need to know that they need about 20 minutes of activities three to four times a day, and a leisurely walk is not enough for them. They are made for action. If you like hiking or jogging, your Belgian Malinois will be happy to be with you. When we take care of Malinois, we should consider training them to obey or compete nimbly. It doesn’t matter what you do, as long as you keep them active. Don’t be surprised if they run around in a big circle in your yard; it’s a remnant of their herding heritage. Malinois puppies have different sports needs. When we take care of Malinois, we need to know that from 9 weeks to 4 months old, the dog kindergarten once or twice a week is a good way for them to exercise, train and socialize. In addition, there are 15 to 20 minutes to play in the yard in the morning and evening. Throw a ball for them to get. When we take care of Malinois, we need to know that from 4 months to 6 months old, weekly obedience class, half mile walk every day, and playing time in the yard can meet their needs. From six months to one year old, play with a ball or Frisbee for 40 minutes on cool mornings or evenings, not in hot days. When we take care of Malinois, we need to know that we continue to limit walking by half a mile. When they are one year old, your Malinois puppy can start jogging with you, but keep within a mile and give them frequent rest on the way. Avoid hard surfaces such as asphalt and concrete. As they mature, you can increase the distance and time you run. These graded exercise levels will protect their developing bones and joints. When we take care of Malinois, we need to know that Malinois is very sensitive and easy to train. Be firm, calm and consistent with them. Anger and violence can backfire.

Take care of Malinois’ coat

When we take care of Malinois, we should know that Malinois’ hair is short and straight, and it’s hard to touch. The hard top coat and thick bottom coat provide weather resistance for dogs that can work outdoors under any conditions. The hair on the neck is slightly longer, forming a mini mane. When we take care of Malinois, we should know that the coat is usually light brown to mahogany, with a black mask on the face, black ears and black tips on the hair. The yellowish brown Malinois sometimes has a little white on the tip of the toe or a small white spot on the chest. Malinois’s short, smooth fur is easy to comb. You can brush with a bristle brush once a week and take a bath when necessary. Malinois loses hair all year round, especially in spring and autumn.

Take care of the health of Malinois

When taking care of Malinois, we need to know that we brush our teeth at least two or three times a week to remove tartar and latent bacteria. If you want to prevent gum disease and bad breath, brush your teeth every day. You should trim your dog’s nails regularly if your dog doesn’t wear out naturally. If you can hear them clicking on the floor, it means they are too long. Short, manicured nails keep the dog’s feet in good condition and prevent your legs from being scratched when your Malinois enthusiastically jumps up to greet you. When we take care of Malinois, we need to know that when your Malinois is used to being brushed and checked, they are a puppy. When we take care of Malinois, we need to know that dogs often use their paws – dogs are very sensitive to their feet – to look at their mouths and ears. Make beauty a positive experience full of praise and reward, and you will lay the foundation for their simple veterinary examination and other treatments as adults. When we take care of Malinois, we should know that when we wash, we should check the skin, nose, mouth, eyes and feet for ulcers, rashes or signs of infection, such as swelling, tenderness or inflammation. The eyes should be clear without redness, swelling or secretions. Your careful weekly check-up will help you detect potential health problems early.

Taking care of Malinois’ training

When we take care of Malinois, we need to know that it has to do some exercise to burn calories, recharge their brains and keep healthy. Everyday sports also help Malinois overcome boredom, which can lead to destructive behavior. Physical activity can cure most of Malinois’ instincts, such as digging, searching, chasing, chewing and grazing. Activity needs may depend on your Malinois’ health and age, but just a 10 minute walk around the block a day may not be enough. When we take care of Malinois, we should know that if your Malinois is a 6 to 18 month old teenager, he may ask for more.
Lock up your Malinois

Take care of the habits of Malinois

When we take care of Malinois, we need to know that your Malinois needs a comfortable and quiet place to rest, away from all the breeze and the floor or the ground. You may want to buy a dog bed or make one out of a wooden box. Put a clean sheet, blanket, quilt or pillow in the bed. Wash your Malinois sheets a lot. If Malinois is often outdoors, make sure she has plenty of cool water and shade in hot weather, and a covered, dry, warm place in cold weather. When we take care of Malinois, we should know that you must pay attention to the permission rules of the community. Make sure you stick your driver’s license on Malinois’ collar. That way, along with an identity tattoo or label, may help ensure your Malinois returns if he happens to be missing.

Taking care of Malinois’ oral health

While many of us may object to our Malinois’ bad breath, we have to pay attention to what it may indicate. When we take care of Malinois, we need to know that smelly breathing usually means that your patient needs a dental examination. Dental plaque caused by unhealthy bacteria can produce a terrible smell, which can only be cured by professional treatment. After you have done a professional cleaning for your Malinois, you can brush your teeth regularly, feed a special diet focusing on dental health, eliminate the food on the table, and keep your gums and teeth in a healthy state. Your veterinarian can give you other advice to minimize oral disease and odor. You can easily brush your teeth with dog toothpaste or a paste made of baking soda and water, twice a week. You can clean them with sterile gauze pads, nylon stockings wrapped around your fingers or a children’s toothbrush. When we take care of Malinois, we should know that periodontal disease is an infection between gingiva and teeth, which often affects malignant tumors. This troublesome condition can sometimes lead to tooth loss and systemic disease. A veterinarian may brush your teeth as a regular part of your Malinois doctor’s health appointment.

Malinois’ bad breath

Even though halitosis caused by oral diseases may not be serious if detected early, sometimes these odors may indicate serious and lasting problems. When we take care of Malinois, we should know that intestinal or liver diseases can also cause bad breath, and fruit and sweet taste may be signs of diabetes. Kidney disease may be the cause if your Malinois breath smells of urine or ammonia. If you notice that your prank has signs of bad breath and other diseases, such as loss of appetite, vomiting or nausea, weight loss, depression, increased drinking or urination, arrange to see her doctor.

Fleas and ticks in Malinois

When we take care of Malinois, we should know that when the weather is warm, it is very important for you to check your Malinois dog for fleas and lice every day. Use a flea comb to find and remove fleas. There are many new techniques for eliminating lice and fleas. Talk to your veterinarian about these and other options.

The heartworm problem of Malinois

how-to-take-care-of-a-malinois

When we take care of Malinois, we need to know that heartworm is a parasite that lives in the heart and spreads from a contaminated dog to your Malinois via mosquitoes. Heartworm infection is fatal. It’s very critical to make sure your Malinois submits for blood worm tests every spring. The monthly pills given to Malinois during the mosquito season are also very good, which can protect her from heart worms. When you and your Malinois travel to a warmer place than usual in winter, they should take preventive drugs during the trip. In some warmer areas, veterinarians recommend taking anti worm drugs throughout the year.

Keep Malinois away from drugs

When we take care of Malinois, we need to know that we should never give you Malinois medicine. We don’t have his veterinary prescription yet. A small ibuprofen tablet is known to cause gastric ulcer cancer. Keep rodenticides and other rodenticides away from your pranks. Buy a Malinois.

Take care of Malinois’ condition

At 6 months of age, male Malinois should be castrated-testicles removed – while female Malinois should be removed – uterus and ovaries removed. As we take care of Malinois, we need to know that nasal spray before adulthood greatly reduces the risk of breast cancer, a common and often fatal condition for old bitches. Hysterectomy can also eliminate the risk of uterine infection, which is a traumatic problem for more mature women and requires intensive medical care. Castration of male Malinois malignancies eliminates the risk of testicular and prostate disease, some aggressive behaviors, and some hernias.