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Can German Wirehaired Pointers be left alone?

Can German Wirehaired Pointers be left alone? Young German wirehaired pointer may have separation anxiety, which requires the host to practice German wirehaired pointer. German wired pointer needs more exercise before I knock on the door. Any professional German wired pointer coach will tell you that this is a high-energy breed. German wired pointer needs a lot of exercises. If it can’t provide exercise for dogs, it will often lead to dogs jumping, barking, chewing, digging, and so on.

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Become the leader of German wirehaired pointer

After coming up with some creative ways to train dogs, I reexamined the importance of rules and structure. Unless a German wired pointer sees you acting like a leader, it’s a bit casual to listen to you. Consistent implementation of the rules can achieve this goal to a large extent.

Make German wired pointer feel comfortable

The reason why German wirehaired pointers are separated is to help the dog feel calm. Many dogs with separation anxiety have no habit of being alone. Often called a Velcro or helicopter dog, their habit of following you around means they don’t practice being alone. As a dog behaviorist, I found that teaching dogs to stay is a good way to help dogs get rid of separation anxiety. I gave the camera to the guardian so I could review how I taught a dog to stay through active training.

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Let German wired pointer practice being alone

Once the guardians have completed their five-minute stay, they can begin to increase the distance. It’s a stage where German wirehaired pointer practices being alone. By gradually increasing the time the dog leaves the guardian, we can help the dog practice alone in the easiest situation without panic. It’s challenging to teach a dog to stay where it is when a German wired pointer is upset, but it’s actually a good lesson. Guardians will need to properly exercise the dog first, avoiding competition with distractions. Once the dog can stay in the absence of the guardian, it can start to gradually increase the time. The more experience Cooper has in remaining calm when he is alone, the less anxiety he has about separation. This is the secret to stop the separation anxiety of German wirehaired pointer.