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Greater Swiss Mountain Dog:Dog Breed Profile

The Greater Switzerland mountain dog is a breed designed by humans. A striking, trichromatic, large, powerful, and firm - looking dog. The largest of the four species of Swiss mountain dogs, it has a smooth coat and a long tail that is always trailing behind it. As with other types, the coat color is mainly black and tan, and the tan area is bounded by black or white spots. The white spots extend to the chest, as well as the toes and the end of the tail.
The Greater Swiss mountain dog, commonly known in Europe as Grosser Schweizer Sennenhund, is the oldest and largest of the four Breeds of Redis, including the Bernice mountain dog. The ancestor of the Swiss dog is said to have been brought by the Romans in the first century BC. In Switzerland, where Bernard dogs are at the peak of their popularity, the greater Swiss mountain dog was once thought to be extinct. In 1908, the first study of mountain dogs at the institute of Mountain Dogs, Dr Albert Heim, discovered dogs, bred them, and eventually succeeded in increasing their Numbers. The dog was approved by FCI in 1939.

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog Breed Picture & Video

  • About Greater Swiss Mountain Dog Breed

    The Greater Switzerland mountain dog is a breed designed by humans. A striking, trichromatic, large, powerful, and firm - looking dog. The largest of the four species of Swiss mountain dogs, it has a smooth coat and a long tail that is always trailing behind it. As with other types, the coat color is mainly black and tan, and the tan area is bounded by black or white spots. The white spots extend to the chest, as well as the toes and the end of the tail. The Greater Swiss mountain dog, commonly known in Europe as Grosser Schweizer Sennenhund, is the oldest and largest of the four Breeds of Redis, including the Bernice mountain dog. The ancestor of the Swiss dog is said to have been brought by the Romans in the first century BC. In Switzerland, where Bernard dogs are at the peak of their popularity, the greater Swiss mountain dog was once thought to be extinct. In 1908, the first study of mountain dogs at the institute of Mountain Dogs, Dr. Albert Heim, discovered dogs, bred them, and eventually succeeded in increasing their Numbers. The dog was approved by FCI in 1939. It is also said to be related to the creation and refinement of the Bernese mountain St. Bernard. Like the Short-haired Breed of the Bernese mountain dog, the coat of the greater Swiss mountain dog is a bright tricolor. Besides Saint Bernard, this dog is probably the largest Swiss mountain dog and probably the oldest. They have been used as leashes in villages and farms for centuries. At the beginning of the 20th century, thanks to the efforts of FranzSchertenlieb and Albert Heim, the greater Swiss mountain dog family was revitalized, and their Numbers have stabilized. The great Swiss mountain dog is very gentle with people, but sometimes unfriendly to other dogs.

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog Breed Daily Care

In our daily care of the greater Switzerland mountain dogs, we should pay attention to the care of their hair, we also need to clean their earwax, in the oral cleaning we need to brush their teeth regularly, which will also reduce the odor. Usually, we can wash the dog every other month, if it is in a high temperature and wet place, we can wash the dog every 1-2 weeks once. Less than half a year old Swiss mountain dog puppies not suitable for a water bath, we can use dry cleaning as appropriate. We can brush dogs frequently daily or every other day with a spray of hair conditioner and baby powder diluted 1000 times or more to replace water.

Here are a few things to keep in mind when feeding our Great Swiss mountain dogs 1. Proper intake of nutrition, appropriate intake of energy, minerals, and easily digestible animal protein from childhood is an important factor to maintain the bone and joint health of large dogs. 2, Do not eat too much energy: Unlike small dogs, large dogs have a low metabolic rate per unit weight, so appropriate energy can maintain a good growth rate and healthy weight of the dog, reduce the joint tissue under too much pressure. Too much nutritious food is not suitable for large dogs. It is better to choose special dog food for large dogs. Be sure to develop the habit of eating dog food. 3, Adequate animal protein supplement: food containing high-quality animal protein can build healthy muscles of dogs, and help dogs have balanced muscle and bone development, good support for large dog joints so that it can enjoy the fun of agile sports. 4. Not too much calcium: Too much calcium in the diet is not appropriate for large dogs. Proper calcium and phosphorus can help dogs of all sizes develop proper bones and maintain healthy bone structures in adulthood.

Greater Swiss mountain dogs can be anemic, which can sometimes make dogs feel dizzy and even faint in severe cases. There are many reasons for anemia in dogs, such as too single intake of insufficient balanced frontal nutrition, chronic digestive diseases, and intestinal parasitic diseases causing intestinal absorption dysfunction leading to deficiency of protein, trace elements, and vitamins. Anemic pet dogs are generally characterized by body malnutrition, body wasting, and weak constitution. The dog's coat is very rough, and its visible mucosa is pale. In the later stage, it is difficult to get up after movement, shaking and falling down, until the body fails. To solve the problem of anemia in pet dogs, we should start with a diet. Prepare a well-balanced diet for your dog and give it a protein-rich, vitamin-rich diet.

A well-trained great Swiss mountain dog should follow his master's orders in every action. The dog is an animal with a strong desire for obedience. A closer look would show that in a time of danger, a dog is not subject to those who play with him, but to those who take him to the task. It is important to know exactly how much freedom to give mountain dogs at what times. Too much freedom can only do harm. The following principles should be followed in your training to make your dog's life easy and fun. 1, the owner of the home is always human, we must in the mountain dog into the house on the first day to let it know what can do, what can't do. 2. Our instructions to the Greater Swiss mountain dog should be brief and forceful. We should avoid using polite words. 3. We should always put praise first. When a great Swiss mountain dog does well, don't forget to give him a few words of praise. Even puppies can tell the difference between praise and reproach from the tone of their owner's voice.

The greater Switzerland mountain dog belongs to the working dog, can be said to be a working dog that the dog's basic physical quality must be good. The body posture and posture of a healthy dog can be very dynamic. Be interested in what's going on around you. Therefore, we should always pay attention to the health condition of the dogs when we take care of the great Swiss mountain dogs. Healthy dogs hold their heads high, and their ears recognize the source of the sound. In addition, a healthy dog has a moist nose, no secretions from the eyes and nose, and pink, healthy skin.

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog Breed History

The great Swiss mountain dog, one of the earliest descendants of the big bull mastiff, was brought to the Alps by the Romans. In remote parts of Switzerland, great Swiss mountain dogs are used by farmers to herd livestock, guard and pull wagons. Of the four breeds of Swiss hound, the Greater Swiss mountain dog is the largest and oldest. For many years, little was known about the origins of the Greater Swiss mountain dog outside Switzerland, but the greater Swiss mountain dog contributed to the early development of St. Bernard and Rottweiler dogs. By the end of the 9th century, many of the jobs previously done by greater Switzerland mountain dogs had been replaced by other breeds or by machines. The greater Swiss mountain dog had been thought to be extinct before it was introduced to renowned canine scientist Albert Heine in 1908. Albert Hern is calling for dog owners to save this ancient Alpine breed and is also bringing other dog breeds into Switzerland. In 1910, the Swiss Kennel Club registered the Greater Switzerland Mountain dogs.