Home / Dog Breeds / Belgian

Belgian:Dog Breed Profile

The Belgian sheepdog is a slightly smaller dog than the German Shepherd and is very intelligent and easy to train. It is handsome, strong, flexible and muscular, alert and energetic, brave and tireless, and can be used for different tasks.
Folk dog lovers also keep the Groanda as a recreational and sports pet. There are four different types of Belgian sheepdogs, namely the short-haired (Belgian Marina), the black long-haired (Belgian Groanda), the variegated long-haired (Belgian Tampilien), and the setae (Belgian Lacanos).

Belgian Breed Picture & Video

  • About Belgian Breed

    The Belgian sheepdog is a slightly smaller dog than the German Shepherd and is very intelligent and easy to train. It is handsome, strong, flexible and muscular, alert and energetic, brave and tireless, and can be used for different tasks. Folk dog lovers also keep the Groanda as a recreational and sports pet. There are four different types of Belgian sheepdogs, namely the short-haired (Belgian Marina), the black long-haired (Belgian Groanda), the variegated long-haired (Belgian Tampilien), and the setae (Belgian Lacan's).


Belgian Breed Daily Care

Regular grooming of the Belgian is an essential step. Belgian's hair is so thick that if it is not treated regularly, its hair will become knotted and, in severe cases, it will be attacked by parasites in order to keep it healthy, we should strengthen the management of it, regularly grooming it, so as to promote its blood circulation. If at any given time, we comb our Belgian regularly, it will help them shed dead hair, get rid of big chunks of dirt, maintain their hair, prevent knots in their fur, and thus prevent skin disease, more can promote blood circulation, enhance skin resistance, relieve fatigue.


For the Belgian sheepdog, the best option would be to feed the dog raw. Even thousands of years of domestication cannot fundamentally change its digestive system or its basic nutritional needs. It relies on meat and fat to provide it with enough energy to survive. A well-balanced raw diet helps the Belgian shepherd to keep his mouth and teeth clean, improve his digestive system and immune system, and build strong muscles. However, there is still a balance to be found in what you eat for your Belgian sheepdog. Meat alone is not enough. It is recommended to combine meat, whole grains, and dog food to make your dog grow more healthily. The Belgian sheepdog is active, likes sports very much, and consumes a lot of heat energy every day. Therefore, the amount of food to be fed should be sufficient. The dog has different body sizes, so the amount of food to be fed should be determined according to the specific size of the dog.

Belgianare generally healthy, with an average life expectancy of 10 to 12 years. They are prone to developmental dysplasia of the HIP, a type of genetic disorder that causes claudication. In addition, there are epilepsy, excessive timidity, eye problems, gastric dilatation, gastric Volvulus, drug allergy, and swallowing foreign bodies. Therefore, when selecting a Belgian puppy, the puppy and its parents must pass a veterinary examination and be certified clean.


We train the Belgian from the ground up, letting it master the discipline bit by bit. When you bring it into your home, it’s essential to train it where to eat and where to sleep and where to defecate. It also needs to be trained to get along with its family, to be friendly and not hostile. You have to be careful when you’re training the Belgian, and you have to let it follow you wherever you go. Because the Belgian is very lively, it must be trained to follow you, do not let it run around. Sometimes we have to give him some other training to make him obey your commands slowly. And when it doesn’t behave well, we have to be tough on it. Don’t spoil it, don’t criticize, praise when you should praise, scold when you should scold.

Belgian is quick on the trigger, friendly and loyal to the owner, and will never make you think he is too sensitive in front of you. The amount of exercise they do is very high, and the health of a Belgian depends on the amount of exercise they do, so we should never keep them at home when we are raising them, and we should always take them out for exercise and running. There’s as much room in the house as possible for them to move around. In addition, we should regularly observe his mental condition, once found anything unusual, it should be taken to the hospital. His toenails also need to be trimmed regularly to prevent them from affecting his Groenendael, and we shouldn’t take the Belgian to unsafe places to prevent cuts on Belgian's toes.

Belgian Breed History

According to the history and origin of the Belgian sheepdog, the Marina is a breed of Belgian sheepdog. So, the Belgian shepherd dog is not just a Marine, it's not just a Granda. A more consistent theory is that the Belgian shepherd was a cross between a central European or local Mastiff and a deerhound introduced from England in the 13th century. Before the 19th century, there were many breeds related to sheepdogs in Belgium. Later, as the need to guard sheep diminished, breeders adapted these sheepdogs to four different color-coated basic breeds, namely black long-haired, short-haired, variegated long-haired, and setae. Fans think of these breeds as different forms of the same breed. The United States regards these four forms as distinct species. Before the beginning of the 20th century, Belgian sheepdogs were widely used to guard sheep around Belgium, but now they are mainly used in military and police circles, or for personal protection.

Konw More About Belgian